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Author Topic: Here is an example of the problems in the calibration field  (Read 1086 times)

Offline mrrob007

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So, while doing my daily job board trolling, I came across this:

Job Description

The Metrology Engineer Intern position provides test system hardware and instrumentation support to Solar’s assembly and test organizations in San Diego and worldwide. This position will: specify, budget, design, test, document, and deliver test systems used to perform tests on turbine engines, gas compressors, turbo-machinery packages, and supporting components. In addition, the Metrology Engineer Intern will provide daily technical engineering support to test technicians, Metrology technicians, and test engineers through data analysis, troubleshooting and establishment of measurement system accuracy.

Additional Specific Job Requirements Are As Follows
Metrology Lab Procedure creation, including automation with Metcal and Labview
Metrology and Test technician training curriculum development: Instrumentation education and troubleshooting
Learn and implement Metrology principles of measurement uncertainty, traceability and auditing
Provide calibration support for Emissions, Dimensional, Pressure, Flow, Temperature, Vibration, AC/DC, and Force instrumentation.
Estimate measurement uncertainty for use in calibration and test results analysis
Develop methods for large scale force measurement calibration
Develop calibrated tool vending and control

Minimum Qualifications
2.7 GPA or higher on a 4.0 scale.
Pursuing a Bachelor's degree in Engineering or Science from an accredited 4 year university or graduate student.
Currently a Sophomore status or higher.

Preferred Qualifications
Exposure to data, traceability and uncertainty analysis.
Experience with analyzing and troubleshooting instrumentation and data acquisition systems.
Familiarity using AutoCAD, LabView or SQL databases.
Excellent communication skills, initiative and applied critical thinking.

So tell me, are skilled techs so undervalued that management thinks engineering interns can write our procedures and training documents? These seem like functions that moderately trained PMEL tech could do without assistance.

Offline ck454ss

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Re: Here is an example of the problems in the calibration field
« Reply #1 on: 02-07-2019 -- 18:52:57 »
Personally I think its a two fold problem.

The biggest issue is qualified techs are hard to find.  Lets face it cal techs are a dying breed because the military doesn't train many anymore and colleges simply haven't picked up the slack.  We are a career that has had to fight tooth and nail for respect  The genius who decided to contract everything out didn't realize all the contractors are ex military.

The second problem is in most larger companies many managers have no clue what people actually do in there jobs anymore because they never have done the job.  Everyone seems to be a kid with a M.B.A.  They come in, do some cost out and get a few feathers in their caps and move up or move out with no regard to the mess they have left leaving it up to us old salty dogs to deal with.

That's just my 2 bits.

Offline PurelyNonsense

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Re: Here is an example of the problems in the calibration field
« Reply #2 on: 02-07-2019 -- 20:33:03 »
That company isn't metrology  minded. Those companies devalue technicians. They think that our experience is fine to calibrate a meter but we shouldn't be allowed a lot of freedom. They think being an engineer gives them prestige. yeah. Right.
And just a side note. I'm working on my MBA right now so I hope to change that young punk with no experience deal for the betterment of calibrators everywhere!

Offline CalLabSolutions

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Re: Here is an example of the problems in the calibration field
« Reply #3 on: 02-07-2019 -- 20:59:52 »
Guys.... This is an Intern position working for the Metrology Engineer...

The job is a fill in the gaps so the rest of the team can be more productive... Without impacting the techs.  and I would be for just a little better than minimum wage.
Michael L. Schwartz
Automation Engineer
Cal Lab Solutions
  Web -  http://www.CalLabSolutions.com
Phone - 303.317.6670

Offline silv3rstr3

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Re: Here is an example of the problems in the calibration field
« Reply #4 on: 02-08-2019 -- 21:57:40 »
Kills me to see job posting like those.  I keep seeing ones that wants RF, Fiber Optic, electronics, physical/dimensional, and programming experience.  Then it says 2-4 years experience required!!

Big companies are hiring technicians that have absolutely no back ground that applies to Metrology.  "But He's Such A Nice Guy!!"  Since they lied their way into the job they have to stop another technician to pretty much do the calibration for them because they don't know jack.  Then they can put on their resume that they are a Deputy/Chief/Engineer/Metrology Scientist and some  actually become Program Managers!  Now they are making decisions that effect multiple labs internationally. 

All I can do is shake my head.  Put on my LG bluetooth headset and jam out all day calibrating and programming.  Everything else is Noise to me.
“They are in front of us, behind us, and we are flanked on both sides by an enemy that out numbers us 29:1. They can’t get away from us now!!”
-Chesty Puller

Offline flow

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Re: Here is an example of the problems in the calibration field
« Reply #5 on: 02-11-2019 -- 21:21:31 »
I've been in on a lot of interviews lately and Here comes the guys fresh out of college talking about he can do everything under the sun. I tell the hiring manager he is not ready for anything that has to do with metrology at all ( The Kids our smart ), He looks at me and says he has a degree and we should be glad to have him! So we hire the guy or I should say We hired all the guys with degrees and after a month they were all gone.The moral of the story is all the good tech are gone or in the process of retiring.Companies are not into taking experience tech to train the young ones..

Offline briansalomon

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Re: Here is an example of the problems in the calibration field
« Reply #6 on: 02-11-2019 -- 22:40:10 »
It does say it's an intern position... However, they are looking to place what they will have available into these positions and that will be someone with a degree and not a PMEL certificate.

I agree the reality is that all or most of the formally trained technicians will retire within the next 5 or 10 years. We should all be training our replacements now and it is possible to train someone who is motivated to learn and has a positive attitude and it can be difficult to train other types.

I'll bet most of our instructors would be surprised to see the success some of us have found. I know mine would.

I am certain some of these interns will succeed as well.
Bring technical excellence with you when you walk in the door every day.

Offline PurelyNonsense

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Re: Here is an example of the problems in the calibration field
« Reply #7 on: 02-12-2019 -- 11:56:14 »
I agree that some interns have potential but a lot of interns are only looking to get that experience and leave. If you find a good one, then great. But there is a lot of issues in the metrology world that are here that we have to fight. First, the mindset that some older techs have "If I train this guy, he'll replace me so I just won't train anyone so I can keep my job." This mentality screws over so many people when that "expert" leaves. No one knows what they did and now there is a knowledge vacuum. Secondly, we rely too much on the military trained personnel to fill those positions. Unfortunately, PMEL is one of the smallest groups in the AF and I know that there aren't many formally trained calibrators in the other services. We need to actively be ready to develop and implement good training programs that mirror what we all had. This intern position after thinking it over can be a positive direction and maybe the company doesn't have metrology minds first, but there is potential and maybe that's what we need is more formal programs.

Offline briansalomon

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Re: Here is an example of the problems in the calibration field
« Reply #8 on: 02-12-2019 -- 21:31:02 »
I agree, there are a hundred reasons for senior technicians to resist training others. It's a given someone will replace the original PMEL techs.

Employers resist giving certain titles as well. If I have "Supervisor" or "Instructor" status in my job description my potential to find a better job increases and my pay will have to go up in order to retain me.

Because of this, employers may increase my pay and want me to train/supervise others without the title.

The old timers who trained me were all active duty guys and I guess there was competition for the Lab Chief position but training was a requirement for everyone. It's worth noting the Air Force had a budget for all this.

I've thought for some time that a private PMEL school makes a lot of sense.

Bring technical excellence with you when you walk in the door every day.

Offline mrrob007

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Re: Here is an example of the problems in the calibration field
« Reply #9 on: 02-13-2019 -- 04:04:30 »
I've been in on a lot of interviews lately and Here comes the guys fresh out of college talking about he can do everything under the sun. I tell the hiring manager he is not ready for anything that has to do with metrology at all ( The Kids our smart ), He looks at me and says he has a degree and we should be glad to have him! So we hire the guy or I should say We hired all the guys with degrees and after a month they were all gone.The moral of the story is all the good tech are gone or in the process of retiring.Companies are not into taking experience tech to train the young ones..
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!  I'm only laughing because I have heard all of that directly out of that mouth.

Offline silv3rstr3

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Re: Here is an example of the problems in the calibration field
« Reply #10 on: 02-13-2019 -- 15:28:47 »
Even though my father was a pilot this picture still makes me laugh.  I do feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to work around guys with 30-40 years experience most of my career.  I'm still repairing equipment older than me which surprisingly we have a lot of spare parts for crazy old sh*t here!

It depends on the individual at the end of the day.  I asked a Gunnery Sergeant at my graduation if he had some advice for me.  He said when you get to your job figure out who is full of sh*t and who actually learned their MOS and show it every day.  Buddy up with them and pick their brain all you can because they won't be stationed their for long.  Good Advice that I've followed ever since that day. 

It's definitely going to be bad for our industry when the old timers retire. The younger people who actually took it seriously will likely be a small percentage in the future.  Hopefully it pays out because I'm not kissing butt to climb the ladder.  Nor will I always work 60 hour weeks to make the amount of money I should make in 40 hours with the knowledge I've worked hard to learn. 
“They are in front of us, behind us, and we are flanked on both sides by an enemy that out numbers us 29:1. They can’t get away from us now!!”
-Chesty Puller

 

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