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Author Topic: ESI 1045A1 DC Measurement System - any info?  (Read 549 times)

Offline LKM

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ESI 1045A1 DC Measurement System - any info?
« on: 08-03-2018 -- 23:34:30 »
Hi all - found one of these and it appears to charge the internal battery and power the detector but I am coming up empty handed on any documentation. It appears to compare a known standard cell to an unknown voltage with 1, 10, 100, 1000V ranges via potentiometers and a null detector.

Calls to IET and TEGAM have been useless. Looks like it was made around 1973. Mostly I'm trying to determine whether or not to rip out the potentiometers. Doesn't look like they are standalone pieces.

Any information at all would be greatly appreciated!

Offline briansalomon

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Re: ESI 1045A1 DC Measurement System - any info?
« Reply #1 on: 08-06-2018 -- 21:20:43 »
I am familiar with the Fluke system which used the 332 DC standard, voltage divider, DC gen/detector and lead compensation unit together with the standard cells to form a DC calibration system.

I have some documentation on the peripheral equipment that your ESI standard was used with, but no documentation on your specific model.

I can tell you this much though, those systems were designed to operate into a null and you needed the whole system in order to get it to function correctly for it's intended purpose which was to calibrate and align precision DC voltage standards.

The DC standard was still of some use as a precision DC voltage source.


 


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