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Miscellaneous => Jobs Forum => Topic started by: carriec on 01-15-2008 -- 18:38:39

Title: Top talent in calibration
Post by: carriec on 01-15-2008 -- 18:38:39
Hello experienced Calibration people,
I work in permanent placement recruiting and almost all of my employers tell me that they prefer the military trained individual due to the exacting nature of how you operate and accomplish tasks withing your graded metrics.
It is difficult for me to get experienced calibration technicians to the telephone when I call a lab. . . . they are always so busy and most Lab Managers do not want to put their "bread and butter" people on the phone with a recruiter.
I know there still must be a group of the hidden candidates who are confidentially looking to make a change but are too busy to aggressively pursue the job search.   After all, you are more attractive to your next employer working, doing what you do best. . . that is why they desire you on their team.
Are there any avenues that anyone can suggest where I can contact qualified calibration technicians and communicate with them about positions in the hidden job market?
Any referral advice would be appreciated.
Thank you.
Carrie
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: RichieRich on 01-15-2008 -- 20:46:05
Wow, that's shocking that lab managers won't let you talk to their techs.  How does the conversation go? 

Carrie:  "Hello Mr. Lab Manager.  Is it possible that I could speak to a few of your technicians in order to lure them away to another company"

Lab Manager: "Well of course Carrie.  Would you like to speak to all of my technicians or just the best ones?  They are on the bench now earning profit for this company but nothing would please me more than pulling them off the bench to talk to you about job opportunities elsewhere!!"
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: USMCPMEL on 01-15-2008 -- 21:07:06
Wow nothing like jumping on the new person posting. If you have a job that you are trying to fill Carrie you can post it here. The people on this website are for the most part kind and considerate.
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: Bryan on 01-15-2008 -- 22:15:09
I'd suppose posting opeings you are recruiting for here would be a good start. 

It's nice to be wanted.

Not sure what the status of the field is in the military these days, I think the Army just about eliminated the calibration specialist in the 90's.  Any sites directed towards military would probably be a good place as well.
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: Broken_Wings on 01-16-2008 -- 10:07:36
http://www.tlgworldwide.com/evolve/templates/aboutus.php?id=24

http://www.mrinetwork.com/pcrbin/positions.exe?action=details&p..job_id=205309847382428&keywords=&nonav=1

All too brief of a job description for most here.

First link tells you they recruit for Michigan. I've noticed some other Michigan oppurtunity commercials on TV. I think there is a major effort in some areas to revitalize industry in general.
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: flew-da-coup on 01-16-2008 -- 11:35:55
Hello experienced Calibration people,
I work in permanent placement recruiting and almost all of my employers tell me that they prefer the military trained individual due to the exacting nature of how you operate and accomplish tasks withing your graded metrics.
It is difficult for me to get experienced calibration technicians to the telephone when I call a lab. . . . they are always so busy and most Lab Managers do not want to put their "bread and butter" people on the phone with a recruiter.
I know there still must be a group of the hidden candidates who are confidentially looking to make a change but are too busy to aggressively pursue the job search.   After all, you are more attractive to your next employer working, doing what you do best. . . that is why they desire you on their team.
Are there any avenues that anyone can suggest where I can contact qualified calibration technicians and communicate with them about positions in the hidden job market?
Any referral advice would be appreciated.
Thank you.
Carrie

 I think here is one of the best places to get leads. It is hard to find people in our field for everyone. We do have a lot of job poetings here, but if you are competitive with pay and benifits then you may get a bite from someone here. Good Luck on finding someone.
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: K-Rock on 01-16-2008 -- 15:47:15

All too brief of a job description for most here.

Carrie-
Welcome to the forum and good luck in your recruitng efforts! I agree with Broken Wings, I would not respond to such a broad posting. That general of a posting tells me that they do not understand (therefore not value) what it is a cal tech does. Also, bachelor degree is the exception, rather than the rule for a calibrator. AA is more typical.
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: RichieRich on 01-16-2008 -- 16:44:13
My point USMC is that it is rather rude to call a place of business blindly fishing for talent to steal away from that place of business.  That actually makes telemarketers look good in comparison.  Anyone is free to speak to any of my employees if they feel they can make them a better offer than I do.  But if they expect me to facilitate that conversation, then I want some of what they are smoking.  Maybe that conversation should be off the clock don't you think???
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: USMCPMEL on 01-16-2008 -- 16:47:24
I am sorry I took your post from a diferent perspective. I completly agree a manager would be nuts to offer up his employees. I also do believe it to be unprofessional to call up a Calibration lab and try to steal thier employees away.
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: PMEL Whore on 01-16-2008 -- 20:24:53
Guys,

I think Carrie is really trying to find some military guys that may be on the verge of getting out.   While she would also probably be happy to poach a good tech, and I can't say I would blame anyone for trying to stop that.   As a retired PMEL guy I know when I was supervising/manging AF PMELs if I had a guy getting out in the future and knew he was looking for a job I would certainly point him in the right direction if I could.   We do need to help our own if we can!

Lighten up on her will ya! 

Good Luck Carrie, also try posting jobs at pmel. org
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: RichieRich on 01-16-2008 -- 21:57:50
Ok, I'm lightening.  Carrie did a perfectly appropriate thing posting here.  This is exactly the right way to do it.   Calling labs trying to poach is the wrong way. 
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: jimmyc on 01-17-2008 -- 15:36:09
unless you have the perfect job that fufills all your needs, (money, flexibility, location,...) then why isn't everyone "looking" for that job that does?  unfortunately Carrie, the people you want are the people employers don't want to lose.  if you want top people, post top jobs.  (not just pay since probably everyone here would take a little less for the job of their dreams)  I work at NASA and it is a great job, but would leave for the right reasons.  there is a reason why all these other techs are looking under the job posting forum page, though most if not all have good jobs.
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: jimmyc on 01-17-2008 -- 16:49:13
First link tells you they recruit for Michigan. I've noticed some other Michigan oppurtunity commercials on TV. I think there is a major effort in some areas to revitalize industry in general.

Posted By BW

i noticed the job posting required a BS from a University...no comments?

University - Bachelor Degree

Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: carriec on 01-17-2008 -- 21:53:18
Hi,
I appreciate all of the comments on the forum and I don't poach or steal, I network and ask for reccomendtion, I still believe overall that people really do want to help if they can, especially if someone works for an unstable company.     We do qualify for the next best career to change a candidate's life and we do that for free for the candidate.   Most of my employer's require the Bachelors degree and they all respect the Military training.   
As far as Michigan??? None of my open positons are in Michigan, I place nationwide. 
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: MIRCS on 01-18-2008 -- 00:02:39
Hi,
I appreciate all of the comments on the forum and I don't poach or steal, I network and ask for reccomendtion, I still believe overall that people really do want to help if they can, especially if someone works for an unstable company.     We do qualify for the next best career to change a candidate's life and we do that for free for the candidate.   Most of my employer's require the Bachelors degree and they all respect the Military training.   
As far as Michigan??? None of my open positons are in Michigan, I place nationwide. 

Well besides the generic listing, could you post specific ones.

As someone said earlier, many will leave for the right job. Location and/or company can make many inquire.
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: carriec on 01-18-2008 -- 13:25:10
Specifically I am working on a position in the Orlando, FL area with a large lab that services the electronics industry.   They need a Lab Supervisor to supervise this commercial calibration and repair location.   This individual will train personnel, review and explain work.     Explains and enforces company rules and regulations.      Appraises performance and recommends changes to pay or status.     Full responsibility for technical task performance.     Responsible for planning, budgeting and staffing projects.     Responsible for the achievement of business objectives    Manages laboratory operations to budgeted financial objectives with Profit and Loss responsibility under the direction of the Branch/District Manager or the National Director of Operations    Provides direct customer interface in support of quality, customer service, sales and marketing objectives.     Participates in sales and marketing planning activities and helps develop and support national strategies.      May be responsible for quoting processes, service agreements, renewals, demand, while establishing time codes for instruments and reviewing and pricing calibration & repair quotes.   
Requirements are:         U. S.  Citizen or U. S.  Permanent Resident status required.         College degree preferred or equivalent.         PMEL training and certification preferred.         A minimum of 4 years experience in the metrology career field.         A minimum of 3 years supervisory experience in a commercial metrology laboratory.        Expertise in at lease one of the following areas; electronic equipment calibration or physical/dimensional calibration.


I am also working on two Sr.  level Calibration Technician positions in Minnesota with a medical device manufacturer.   They would like to see the PMEL training (no Bachelors degree needed)and a broad scope of calibration experience including electromechanical, mechanical, optical, pneumatic, hydromechanical and pressure type measuring.   These technicians will test, calibrate, adjust and maintain indicating instruments to conform to set standards.

Both of these client companies are stable corporations that offer competitive salary ranges, full benefits and relocation assistance.

If anyone is interested and wants to hear more, please send me an email to carrie@tlgworldwide. com.
Thank you :-)
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: Eichampt on 02-03-2008 -- 04:48:33
FYI. . . If you want to break through the glass ceiling, you'll need a BS or higher to become than just a bench tech.  We're highly trained already, but it only helps our job outlook to have an education beyond AA/AS.  Most PMEL techs across the country only make between 18-28 per hour.  You'll make ok money as a trained PMEL tech, but w/o the BS or higher, you're really selling yourself short.  I personnally don't know any tech who makes more than 55k per year.  For those in the military, you don't have a good excuse not to take advantage of the 100% TA or GI bill.  GET THAT DEGREE!!!
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: CalibratorJ on 02-06-2008 -- 03:18:08
Any chance of getting some locations of your job openings? Particularly in the Northern Alabama/Southern Tennessee area?

Sorry- just signed up on these forums and there are a lot of posts to look through to find job locations. . . . . .
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: flew-da-coup on 02-06-2008 -- 10:54:29
FYI. . . If you want to break through the glass ceiling, you'll need a BS or higher to become than just a bench tech.  We're highly trained already, but it only helps our job outlook to have an education beyond AA/AS.  Most PMEL techs across the country only make between 18-28 per hour.  You'll make ok money as a trained PMEL tech, but w/o the BS or higher, you're really selling yourself short.  I personnally don't know any tech who makes more than 55k per year.  For those in the military, you don't have a good excuse not to take advantage of the 100% TA or GI bill.  GET THAT DEGREE!!!

 Almost every tech I know makes more than $55k a year w/o a BS. I have a Degree in Theology,but it doesn't help me LOL.
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: jimmyc on 02-06-2008 -- 13:41:49
once you have a BS, why would you stay a bench tech?  i do make more than 55k and love working on the bench.  having been the "man" for a while, it is a nice break.  when i do decide to go back to the dark side, i have no idea what a degree would do for besides "pad" a resume.  if your lab manager is also the business manager, then i guess a degree in that would be useful???
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: ZZ on 02-07-2008 -- 09:09:56
Quote from: flew-da-coup link=topic=930. msg10618#msg10618 date=1202295269
Quote from: Eichampt link=topic=930. msg10607#msg10607 date=1202014113
FYI.  .  .  If you want to break through the glass ceiling, you'll need a BS or higher to become than just a bench tech.   We're highly trained already, but it only helps our job outlook to have an education beyond AA/AS.   Most PMEL techs across the country only make between 18-28 per hour.   You'll make ok money as a trained PMEL tech, but w/o the BS or higher, you're really selling yourself short.   I personnally don't know any tech who makes more than 55k per year.   For those in the military, you don't have a good excuse not to take advantage of the 100% TA or GI bill.   GET THAT DEGREE!!!

 Almost every tech I know makes more than $55k a year w/o a BS.  I have a Degree in Theology,but it doesn't help me LOL. 


It looks like you wasted your time getting that theology degree.  Maybe with a few years at any given company, you'll be at 55k+, but most companies start PMEL techs below 45k.  High cost of living areas don't count.  Garbage collectors sometimes make more than our bretheren.  If you have a RELEVANT degree in a science with management, then you have a lot more promotion potential.  Can't say I want to be a 50-60 year old bench tech.
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: flew-da-coup on 02-07-2008 -- 11:01:07
Quote from: flew-da-coup link=topic=930. msg10618#msg10618 date=1202295269
Quote from: Eichampt link=topic=930. msg10607#msg10607 date=1202014113
FYI.  .  .  If you want to break through the glass ceiling, you'll need a BS or higher to become than just a bench tech.   We're highly trained already, but it only helps our job outlook to have an education beyond AA/AS.   Most PMEL techs across the country only make between 18-28 per hour.   You'll make ok money as a trained PMEL tech, but w/o the BS or higher, you're really selling yourself short.   I personnally don't know any tech who makes more than 55k per year.   For those in the military, you don't have a good excuse not to take advantage of the 100% TA or GI bill.   GET THAT DEGREE!!!

 Almost every tech I know makes more than $55k a year w/o a BS.  I have a Degree in Theology,but it doesn't help me LOL. 


It looks like you wasted your time getting that theology degree.  Maybe with a few years at any given company, you'll be at 55k+, but most companies start PMEL techs below 45k.  High cost of living areas don't count.  Garbage collectors sometimes make more than our bretheren.  If you have a RELEVANT degree in a science with management, then you have a lot more promotion potential.  Can't say I want to be a 50-60 year old bench tech.

 Some may say that I wasted my time on a degree in Theology, but I don't. I didn't get the degree to further my career in Metrology anyway. I have used my Theology degree for 8 years as a part time youth minister for a very large church. I may do it again in the future and I really enjoyed the subject. Also if you noticed the LOL after my post that was used to show a level of facetiousness.
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: ZZ on 02-08-2008 -- 04:51:05
Quote from: flew-da-coup link=topic=930. msg10625#msg10625 date=1202382067
Quote from: ZZ link=topic=930. msg10624#msg10624 date=1202375396
Quote from: flew-da-coup link=topic=930.  msg10618#msg10618 date=1202295269
Quote from: Eichampt link=topic=930.  msg10607#msg10607 date=1202014113
FYI.   .   .   If you want to break through the glass ceiling, you'll need a BS or higher to become than just a bench tech.    We're highly trained already, but it only helps our job outlook to have an education beyond AA/AS.    Most PMEL techs across the country only make between 18-28 per hour.    You'll make ok money as a trained PMEL tech, but w/o the BS or higher, you're really selling yourself short.    I personnally don't know any tech who makes more than 55k per year.    For those in the military, you don't have a good excuse not to take advantage of the 100% TA or GI bill.    GET THAT DEGREE!!!

 Almost every tech I know makes more than $55k a year w/o a BS.   I have a Degree in Theology,but it doesn't help me LOL.  


It looks like you wasted your time getting that theology degree.   Maybe with a few years at any given company, you'll be at 55k+, but most companies start PMEL techs below 45k.   High cost of living areas don't count.   Garbage collectors sometimes make more than our bretheren.   If you have a RELEVANT degree in a science with management, then you have a lot more promotion potential.   Can't say I want to be a 50-60 year old bench tech. 

 Some may say that I wasted my time on a degree in Theology, but I don't.  I didn't get the degree to further my career in Metrology anyway.  I have used my Theology degree for 8 years as a part time youth minister for a very large church.  I may do it again in the future and I really enjoyed the subject.  Also if you noticed the LOL after my post that was used to show a level of facetiousness.


More power to you coup.  Keep living the dream. . . LOL! (Sarcasm implied)
Title: Re: Top talent in calibration
Post by: hotncold on 02-10-2008 -- 09:42:36
I'm a cal tech in a big Pharma company but I have to say I do more than just bench work.   I also do some engineering stuff/backup supervisor/etc.   I have a BASEET degree but always looking for opportunities.   I've been at this company for 16+ years with no military experience.   I've been trained in temperature, dimensional, electrical (DC/LO RF), pressure, optical, humidity, mass, analytical, air flow, etc.   I've worked with reference standards like temperature fixed points, Thunder 9000 generator, spectrophotometers, etc. 

Carrie - Got anything in IL/WI area?  We have 10 Standards Labs techs and about 50 area shop techs.   I average 85K a year with about 10% OT and minimal travel.